How Uttarakhand got its Name

Uttarakhand

Uttarakhand. officially the State of Uttarakhand, formerly known as Uttaranchal, is a state in the northern part of India.

It is often referred to as the Devbhumi (literally "Land of the Gods") due to many Hindu temples and pilgrimage centres found throughout the state.Uttarakhand's name is derived from the Sanskrit words uttara meaning 'north', and khaṇḍa meaning 'land', altogether simply meaning 'Northern Land'. Ancient rock paintings, rock shelters, paleolithic stone tools (hundreds of thousands of years old), and megaliths provide evidence that the mountains of the region have been inhabited since prehistoric times.The Pauravas, Kushanas, Kunindas, Guptas, Gurjara-Pratihara, Katyuris, Raikas, Palas, Chands, Parmars or Panwars, and the British have ruled Uttarakhand in turns.It is believed that the sage Vyasa scripted the Hindu epic Mahabharata in the state.Between the 4th and 14th centuries, the Katyuri dynasty dominated lands of varying extent from the Katyur (modern day Baijnath) valley in Kumaon. The historically significant temples at Jageshwar are believed to have been built by the Katyuris and later remodelled by the Chands.By the medieval period, the region was consolidated under the Garhwal Kingdom in the west and the Kumaon Kingdom in the east.After India attained independence from the British, the Garhwal Kingdom was merged into the state of Uttar Pradesh, where Uttarakhand composed the Garhwal and Kumaon Divisions.On 24 September 1998, the Uttar Pradesh Legislative Assembly and Uttar Pradesh Legislative Council passed the Uttar Pradesh Reorganisation Bill, which began the process of creating a new state. Two years later the Parliament of India passed the Uttar Pradesh Reorganisation Act, 2000 and thus, on 9 November 2000, Uttarakhand became the 27th state of the Republic of India.